Plenary: SRM Experiments Campfire

16:00 - 17:30

Our team is interested in conducting one of the first outdoor solar geoengineering experiments in the U.S. (possibly within a year or two). Public engagement, of course, is essential. This session will provide an opportunity for researchers to engage on the substance of the experiment and to discuss broader engagement.

Convened by: 

David Keith

Organisation: 
Harvard University
Country: 
United States of America

David Keith has worked near the interface between climate science, energy technology, and public policy for twenty-five years. He took first prize in Canada's national physics prize exam, won MIT's prize for excellence in experimental physics, and was one of TIME magazine's Heroes of the Environment. David is Professor of Applied Physics in Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and Professor of Public Policy in the Harvard Kennedy School, and founder at Carbon Engineering, a company developing technology to capture of CO2 from ambient air to make carbon-neutral hydrocarbon fuels. Best known for work on the science, technology, and public policy of solar geoengineering, David is leading the development of an interfaculty research initiative on solar geoengineering at Harvard. David’s work has ranged from the climatic impacts of large-scale wind power to an early critique of the prospects for hydrogen fuel. David’s hardware engineering projects include the first interferometer for atoms, a high-accuracy infrared spectrometer for NASA's ER-2, and currently, development of CO2 capture pilot plants for Carbon Engineering. David teaches courses on Science and Technology Policy and on Energy and Environmental Systems where he has reached students worldwide with an online edX course. He has writing for the public with A case for climate engineering from MIT Press. Based in Cambridge, David spends about a third of his time in Canmore Alberta.

Lizzie Burns

Organisation: 
Harvard University
Country: 
USA

Lizzie is the Program Director of Harvard's Solar Geoengineering Research Program and a Fellow at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Prior to Harvard, Lizzie worked for the non-profit advocacy organization Opportunity Nation. She also staffed a U.S. Senate campaign and served as an intern at the White House Council on Environmental Quality. Lizzie graduated from Williams College with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Political Science and from the Harvard Kennedy School with a Master in Public Policy.

Speakers: 

Mark Lawrence (Advisory Group Chair)

Organisation: 
Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) Potsdam
Country: 
Germany

Prof. Dr. Mark Lawrence is Managing Scientific Director at the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS). His primary areas of research are the impacts and mitigation of short-lived, climate-forcing pollutants (SLCPs), and on the potential impacts, uncertainties and risks of climate engineering.

He received his Ph.D. in 1996 in Earth and Atmospheric Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, (USA). His Ph.D. research was mainly conducted at the Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry (MPIC) in Mainz.From 2000 until 2005, he led an independent junior research group at the MPIC, and in 2006 he took over the atmospheric modelling group at the MPIC. He received his Habilitation in 2006 at the University of Mainz, where he also served as interim professor for meteorology during 2009-2010, winning the 2010 annual Teaching Award from the State of Rheinland-Pfalz, as well as a University Teaching Award. In 2011 he moved to the IASS, and in 2014 he was appointed as an Honorary Professor at the University of Potsdam.

Prof. Lawrence is author or co-author of over 100 peer-reviewed publications.  He co-coordinated the EU project “MEGAPOLI” (2008-2011) and coordinated the project “EuTRACE” (European Transdisciplinary Assessment of Climate Engineering, 2012-2014). He has served as editor for the journals Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, and Atmospheric Environment, and has served or serves on various international committees, most notably the Scientific Steering Committee of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry project (IGAC, for which he is co-chair from 2015-2018), the Science Team of the UNEP Atmospheric Brown Clouds project (ABC), and the international Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution (iCACGP), as well as being a contributing author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report.

Frank Keutsch

Organisation: 
Harvard University
Country: 
USA

Born in Tübingen, Germany, Frank Keutsch received his Diplom in chemistry from the Technische Universität München, Germany, under the supervision of Vladimir E. Bondybey in 1997. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of California at Berkeley in 2001. His graduate research was conducted under the direction of Richard J. Saykally and focused on vibration−rotation−tunneling spectroscopy and hydrogen-bond-breaking dynamics in water clusters. After working on stratospheric chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University under the direction of James G. Anderson he started his independent academic career in 2005 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He then moved to his current position as Stonington Professor of Engineering and Atmospheric Science at Harvard University. His research combines laboratory and field experiments with instrument development to investigate fundamental mechanisms of anthropogenic influence on atmospheric composition within the context of impacts on climate, humans and the environment.