Parallel Session: Social Movements & Climate Engineering Justice from the Periphery

14:00 - 15:30

Debate around the justice of geoengineering has often, implicitly or explicitly, assumed the perspective of high-emitting groups that are disproportionately responsible for climate engineering research. We should re-orient our normative thinking regarding climate engineering research, governance, and deployment to include the agency and perspectives of the global South and subaltern groups. We will convene global representatives from diverse social movements to lead intersectional discussions on what geoengineering means for racial and environmental justice, food sovereignty, youth, gender, health and global justice as well as climate justice.

Convened by: 

Patrick Taylor-Smith

Organisation: 
National University Singapore
Country: 
Singapore

Patrick Taylor Smith is an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science and Global Studies at the National University of Singapore. He works primarily in global and intergenerational justice in the context of climate change and geoengineering. He is currently writing a book developing a non-ideal theory of just revolution as well as an article applying that account of revolution to potential SRM interventions by the developing world. He has published articles in such journals as Transnational Legal Theory, Philosophy and Public Issues, and the Journal of Applied Philosophy as well as several book chapters and reviews. 

Jim Thomas

Organisation: 
ETC Group
Country: 
Canada

Duncan McLaren

Organisation: 
Lancaster Environment Centre
Country: 
United Kingdom

Duncan McLaren is currently a freelance consultant and researcher, and part-time PhD student at Lancaster University investigating the justice implications of climate geoengineering. From August 2017 he will be working on the UK-research council funded 'Avoiding Mitigation Deterrence in Greenhouse Gas Removal’ project at Lancaster Environment Centre.  His research interests extend from cities and sustainability, to climate change, energy and geoengineering, with particular focus on the interactions of technology and behavior, and on issues of justice arising in these areas and the consequences for policy.  He is currently an advisor to the Virgin Earth Challenge, for the development of a commercially viable, scalable and sustainable form of carbon removal, and a member of the Leverhulme Centre for Climate Change Mitigation International Advisory Board. Previously he worked for many years in environmental research and advocacy, most recently as Chief Executive of Friends of the Earth Scotland from 2003 until 2011, where he was influential in the adoption of world leading climate change legislation by the Scottish Parliament. In 2011 he moved to Sweden to spend more time with his children.

Speakers: 

David Morrow

Organisation: 
American University & Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment
Country: 
USA

David Morrow studies the ethics and governance of climate engineering. He is a Faculty Fellow with the Forum for Climate Engineering Assessment at American University in Washington, DC, as well as a Visiting Fellow at the Institute for Philosophy & Public Policy at George Mason University. Prior to moving to Washington, he was an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Aniruddh Mohan

Aniruddh Mohan
Organisation: 
Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy
Country: 
India, Germany

Aniruddh Mohan is a climate and energy policy researcher from India currently based at the Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment & Energy through the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation’s International Climate Protection Fellowship. His research focuses on the future of energy systems, global climate politics, and the social dimensions of technological change.

Octavio Rosas-Landa

Organisation: 
National University Mexico
Country: 
Mexico

Octavio Rosas-Landa is an economist from the National University in Mexico City. He teaches Political Economy and Mexico-US Labor Migration at the Faculty of Economics since 1995, and has been researching and working with local (peasant, indigenous and urban communities) for the past 20 years around the economic, social and environmental impacts of new technologies in the livelihoods of local communities, as well as processes of organization and education around environmental devastation in Mexico since the enactment of NAFTA. Since 2008 Octavio is one of the founders and member of the Council of Representatives of the National Assembly of Environmentally Affected Peoples (ANAA) in Mexico, a grassroots organization that advises and develops strategies for the legal, technical and social defense of local communities against the environmental destruction of their territories. From 2012 until 2014 he coordinated the Hearing on Environmental Devastation and Peoples' Rights of the Mexican Session of the Permanent Peoples' Tribunal (heir to the Russell Tribunal), which gathered and presented over 200 singular cases of environmental destruction in Mexico.

Nnimmo Bassey

Organisation: 
Health of Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF)
Country: 
Nigeria

Nnimmo Bassey is a Nigerian environmental justice activist, architect, essayist and poet. He is the director of the ecological think-tank, Health of Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF) and coordinator of Oilwatch International. He was the chair of Friends of the Earth International (the largest grassroots environmental organisation in the world) from 2008-2012 as well as the co-founder and executive director of Environmental Rights Action (1993-2013) which is based in Nigeria (in Benin city, Lagos, Abuja, Port Harcourt and Yenagoa).He was a co-recipient of the 2010 Right Livelihood Award also known as the “Alternative Nobel Prize.” In 2012 he received the Rafto Human Rights Award and in 2014 he was awarded Nigeria’s national honour as a Member of the Federal Republic (MFR) in recognition of his environmental activism.Nnimmo Bassey is the author of the highly acclaimed book, To Cook a Continent, which details the destructive impacts of the extractive industries and the climate crises in Africa.